Lake Rotorua

Content

Lake Rotorua 

With the city of Rotorua on its shores, Lake Rotorua is loved by locals and tourists alike. Surrounded by lush farmland, native bush and steaming geothermal springs and vents, the lake has a distinct dark green-yellow colour due to its high content of sulphur and other volcanic minerals. A fan of trout fishing? You’re in for a treat – Lake Rotorua is considered the most productive trout fishery in New Zealand.

Lake Rotorua is the largest lake in the district. Although beautiful and peaceful, this lake has a violent history – it was one of several large volcanoes in the region and was formed when an underlying magma chamber collapsed after a massive eruption around 200,000 years ago.

MOKOIA ISLAND

Mokoia Island, which sits in the centre of Lake Rotorua, is the most famous lake island in the country and linked to the love story of Hinemoa and Tutanekai. It tells the tale of young chief Tutanekai and his high-born love, Hinemoa, whose family forbade her from marrying him. To stop the young lovers meeting, the family beach the couple’s waka (canoe) but in answer, Tutanekai plays his flute, the music wafting across Lake Rotorua every night. Overcome with love, Hinemoa swims to him, buoyed by gourds, only to find Tutanekai has returned to his whare (house) to sleep. Arriving at Mokoia Island naked, she’s unable to enter the village, so she immerses herself in a hot pool. Tutanekai’s slave arrives and Hinemoa lures him, smashes his gourd and sends him back to his master. An enraged Tutanekai investigates, only to fall into Hinemoa’s embrace.


Today, Mokoia Island is a sanctuary for endangered birds and wildlife.

The lake’s water quality

The lake’s water quality is the best it’s been in decades due to our programme of alum dosing, but the key to long term sustainable water quality is reducing nutrients from land use. We’re aiming to do this through an integrated framework of solutions which includes:

Content

Lake Rotorua 

With the city of Rotorua on its shores, Lake Rotorua is loved by locals and tourists alike. Surrounded by lush farmland, native bush and steaming geothermal springs and vents, the lake has a distinct dark green-yellow colour due to its high content of sulphur and other volcanic minerals. A fan of trout fishing? You’re in for a treat – Lake Rotorua is considered the most productive trout fishery in New Zealand.

Lake Rotorua is the largest lake in the district. Although beautiful and peaceful, this lake has a violent history – it was one of several large volcanoes in the region and was formed when an underlying magma chamber collapsed after a massive eruption around 200,000 years ago.

MOKOIA ISLAND

Mokoia Island, which sits in the centre of Lake Rotorua, is the most famous lake island in the country and linked to the love story of Hinemoa and Tutanekai. It tells the tale of young chief Tutanekai and his high-born love, Hinemoa, whose family forbade her from marrying him. To stop the young lovers meeting, the family beach the couple’s waka (canoe) but in answer, Tutanekai plays his flute, the music wafting across Lake Rotorua every night. Overcome with love, Hinemoa swims to him, buoyed by gourds, only to find Tutanekai has returned to his whare (house) to sleep. Arriving at Mokoia Island naked, she’s unable to enter the village, so she immerses herself in a hot pool. Tutanekai’s slave arrives and Hinemoa lures him, smashes his gourd and sends him back to his master. An enraged Tutanekai investigates, only to fall into Hinemoa’s embrace.


Today, Mokoia Island is a sanctuary for endangered birds and wildlife.

Lake Rotorua Nutrient Management Rules

A set of rules to remove 140 tonnes of nitrogen from entering Lake Rotorua from pastoral farming.

Details

Gorse Conversion Programme

$2.5 million fund to remove up to 30 tonnes of nitrogen

Details

Lake Rotorua Incentives Programme

$40 million incentive fund to remove 100 tonnes of nitrogen through voluntary land use

Details

Engineering solutions

Regional Council will use engineering initiatives to remove up to 50 tonnes of nitrogen. 

 

Current Lakes Closures / Events

31 December 2018 - 1 January 2019

Event / Who

New Years Eve Fireworks Display (Glo Festival), Falconer Enterprises

Time/Closure/Usage

Set up: TBC

Display: 9.30pm - 10pm

Pack Down: TBC

Description

Adjacent Lakefront

Provisional Booking

There are no health warnings.
Recent Monitoring Results
Click here to view full test analysis
There are currently no health warnings for Rotorua
Water Quality
Recent Blue Green Algae
Monitoring Results
Click here to view latest test results

News & Events

Lake Rotorua science review completed

Lake Rotorua science review completed

The Bay of Plenty Regional Council is on track...

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Lake Ōkāreka update February 2019

Lake Ōkāreka update February 2019

The water level in Lake Ōkāreka is now well...

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Health warning lifted for Lake Okaro

Health warning lifted for Lake Okaro

Health warning lifted for Lake Okaro The...

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Progress on post-flood action plan for Ngongotahā

Progress on post-flood action plan for Ngongotahā

Joint Rotorua Lakes Council and Bay of Plenty...

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Rerewhakaaitu farmers managing nutrients to protect local lakes

Rerewhakaaitu farmers managing nutrients to protect local lakes

Farmers from the Rerewhakaaitu community are...

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Lake Ōkāreka update

Lake Ōkāreka update

Bay of Plenty Regional Council has prepared a...

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Looking after our lakes

Cleaning up

Lake Rotorua

What we
are doing
to help

Who we 

Are